What is it like?

Attending a show performed by Stage & Steel Productions allows you, the audience, to participate in a fun and exciting form of theatre. Our shows encourage audience participation in unique ways. From dancing with actual characters in a show, cheering your favorite hero or booing your favorite villain, to being chosen to deliver a few lines with the actors themselves. You won’t soon forget a Stage & Steel Production.

Combat or Non-Combat

So What is Stage Combat?

Is it hard?

So is there any real acting involved?

What are the costumes like?

 

Combat or Non-Combat

Roles are designated as a combat part or a non-combat part. Not all actors want to fight and some opt to start in a non-combat role while learning stage combat to see if they like it. Combat Roles, in a show, have different levels of required skill.

So What is Stage Combat?

There are many forms of combat that is performed on stages all across the world. Stage & Steel focuses primarily on the Broad Sword with some Staff, Hand to Hand, Dagger and Shield work. 50 percent of all rehearsal time is spent on learning the principles of Broad Sword work and working on mastering choreography. Safety is at the forefront of each and every lesson. Every actor is responsible for their own safety and for the safety of every person around them.

The principles of the Broad Sword are easy to pick up but mastering them takes time. As an actor's abilities with the weapons grow so do the challenge level of the choreographies that they are given. No actor is asked to do something that they do not feel comfortable doing. Each fight performed is tailored to the abilities of the participants.

New members start at the beginning and work their way up. It takes a bit of practice and time to develop a good fighting style. One show is definitely not enough time to master the art form and many actors return to continue their training.

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Is it hard?

Well, it is a workout. It does require a certain amount of dexterity. From the very first day you will be trying to get both your right and left hands to work together. Foot work is very important and actors learn quickly just how many "left feet" they have and then work on reducing that number. Then you need to train your eyes to see what your partner is doing. You need to learn to be self aware of your environment. There is the acting thing that has to occur and the memorizing of the choreography. And above all breathe!

New members start at the beginning and work their way through all of those areas one at a time. Games are played along the way to keep things light and fun. It is like any other sport or art form, it takes time to master.

Training Gallery

Check out the training gallery. Here you will find pictures of Stage & Steel hard at work.

 

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